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Heart Valve Treatment Options

Treatment checklist
Treatment Options Checklist

Bring this list of questions about heart valve disease treatment to your next appointment with your doctor—and be sure to take notes during your conversation.

Heart Valve Disease Treatment Options

If you have been diagnosed with heart valve disease, one or more of your heart valves may need to be replaced or repaired for your heart to work properly. Many people living with heart valve disease do not require surgery. For others, the condition is more serious. 

Your cardiologist will know which treatment, if any, you should receive for your heart valve disease. The decision will be based on the type of heart valve disease, the severity of the damage, your age and your medical history.

Heart valve disease medication

If you do not need heart valve surgery right away, your physician may prescribe medication to treat your symptoms and help avoid further valve damage. Common medications include:

  • Diuretics
  • Anti-arrhythmic medications
  • Vasodilators
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors
  • Beta blockers
  • Anticoagulants (blood thinners)

Be sure to take these medications as directed and talk to your doctor if you have questions.

Heart valve repair

Heart valve repair is a surgical procedure to repair a heart valve that is not working properly. Heart valve repair usually involves the heart valve leaflets that open and close to pump blood through the heart.

Learn more about heart valve repair.

Heart valve replacement

If it is not possible to repair your heart valve, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the damaged valve and implant an artificial (prosthetic) valve in its place. There are two types of prosthetic valves used for replacement: mechanical and tissue.

Learn more about heart valve replacement.

Talking about your options

One of the healthiest moves you can make is to actively participate in your own care. Talk with your doctor about your diagnosis and get support from family and friends.

Learn more about talking about your options.