Structural Heart Occluders

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Featured Structural Heart Occluders

AMPLATZER™ products for a range of defects

We design our AMPLATZER™ occluders to meet the unique anatomical needs associated with specific heart defects, including atrial septal defects, (ASDs), patent ductus arteriosus (PDS), patent foramen ovales (PFOs) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs). With a variety of shapes and sizes and features that facilitate precise placement, our occluders have the potential to simplify procedures. And each offers the reliable performance and procedural flexibility you expect from our products.

The occluders featured here represent solutions with our latest technologies. You can find other occlusion devices and structural heart products in our full product catalog.

Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) Closure Devices

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AMPLATZER™ Septal Occluder

The AMPLATZER™ septal occluder, or ASO, is designed to appose the septal wall on both sides of a defect to create a platform for tissue in-growth after implantation. 

Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) Closure Devices

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AMPLATZER™ Duct Occluder II

Designed for flexibility, the AMPLATZER™ duct occluder II conforms to a variety of ducts while achieving complete closure from a pulmonary or aortic approach.

Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) Closure Devices

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AMPLATZER™ Muscular VSD Occluder

The AMPLATZER™ muscular VSD occluder features a double-disc design made from self-expandable Nitinol wire mesh, with a thick waist to accommodate ventricular tissue.

Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) Closure Devices

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AMPLATZER™ PFO Occluder

The AMPLATZER™ PFO Occluder is indicated for percutaneous transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) to reduce the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients predominately between the ages of 18 and 60 years, who have had a cryptogenic stroke due to a presumed paradoxical embolism, as determined by a neurologist and cardiologist following an evaluation to exclude known causes of ischemic stroke.