We Heart Kids™

Photo of young girl laughing outdoors, text on image: When It Comes to Kids, We
Photo of young girl laughing outdoors, text on image: When It Comes to Kids, We
Meeting the Challenge of Congenital Heart Disease

With our technological innovation, clinical leadership, community partnerships and the stories we help tell, we are proud to shine a spotlight on pediatric cardiology and congenital heart defects, including atrial septal defects, and to support kids, families and caretakers through their toughest battles.

Sharing Stories and Spreading Hope

Every heartbeat counts, and every little heart has a big story to tell

In our featured stories, meet the families of Romeo and Kim; both children were born with heart problems and received medical devices through St. Jude Medical. Then learn of our work with Children’s HeartLink, and the important impact this non-profit organization is having on the cardiac care and treatment of children in underserved parts of the world.

The opportunity to give kids a chance to grow up… is just an incredible opportunity. 
–Rachel Ellingson, VP, Corporate Strategy

Community Partnership: Mended Little Hearts 

With Mended Little Hearts, we have worked to provide a new interactive resource—the Mended Little HeartGuide—featuring reliable, accurate information on over 30 topics, as well as critical support and educational resources, for families, caregivers and children affected by congenital heart defects.

Below, download our infographic with important statistics about CHDs and access the Mended Little HeartGuide.

A new resource for families of kids with congenital heart disease (CHD)

Congenital heart disease is a common diagnosis that challenges families in many ways. Learn some important statistics about this disease and how families can cope with a CHD diagnosis.  

Hand with thumb facing up holding a paintbrush against a red, painted heart

The Mended Little HeartGuide is an interactive resource that includes PDFs and writable forms, videos and audio clips, an interactive glossary and ways for families and caregivers dealing with CHD to connect.

Photo of child

Community Partnership: Children’s HeartLink

With the St. Jude Medical Foundation, we work with Children’s HeartLink International, donating St. Jude Medical™ devices to be used for educating physicians about pediatric interventional cardiology. 

One example is our partnership in India. Access to high-quality pediatric care is problematic in India due to a shortage of trained professionals to treat children with congenital heart disease, and because many people cannot afford treatment. St. Jude Medical and the St. Jude Medical Foundation partner with Children's HeartLink to provide access to sustainable health care within such underserved communities. 

Our hospital partner, the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre (AIMS) in Kochi, India, selects families with significant financial need to qualify for free-of-charge services.

Clinical Leadership in Pediatric Cardiology

St. Jude Medical is a leader in the research, design and development of electrophysiology and interventional cardiology solutions for pediatric patients worldwide. We are one of the few medical device companies in the world to have two ongoing U.S. cardiology IDE clinical trials for pediatric patients.

At St. Jude Medical, we aim to give children the big break they deserve.
–Dr. Mark Carlson, Chief Medical Officer

Our recent areas of focus include the following:

ADO II AS pediatric clinical trial

The U.S. IDE clinical trial will evaluate the St. Jude Medical™ AMPLATZER™ Duct Occluder II AS*,4 (ADO II AS), a first-of-its-kind device specifically designed for closure of the small patent ductus arteriosus (PDA).

Our HALO clinical trial

This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the St. Jude Medical™ Masters Series HP 15 mm mechanical heart valve*,5, the smallest pediatric mechanical heart valve in the world.

Results from a post-approval study relating to ASDs

This study involved the AMPLATZER™ Septal Occluder6, a device that closes atrial septal defects (ASDs), abnormal openings or holes in the wall between the upper chambers (atria) of the heart.

An implantable pediatric VAD

With the acquisition of Thoratec Corporation, we can further support children with the PediMag™ Blood Pump7, a ventricular assist device (VAD) that acts as a short-term solution to support circulation while physicians and families consider longer-term options


About St. Jude Medical

St. Jude Medical is a medical device company committed to advancing the treatment of some of the world’s most expensive epidemic diseases, including congenital heart disease.

We are inspired by kids living with CHDs, including atrial septal defects, and their heroic families, who never give up hope. That is one reason we are proud to be a market leader in the research, design and development of electrophysiology and interventional cardiology solutions for pediatric patients worldwide.

Learn more about St. Jude Medical.

Discover more about our global operations.

St. Jude Medical Headquarters building in St. Paul, Minnesota
REFERENCES
*Caution: Investigational device. Limited by Federal (or United States) law to investigational use. Not available for sale in the United States.
1. van der Linde, D., Koning, E. E., Slager, M. A., Witsenburg, M., Helbing, W. A., Takkenberg, J. J., & Roos-Hesselink, J. W. (2011). Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease worldwide: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 58(21), 2241-2247. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2011.08.025
2. Oster, M. E., Lee, K. A., Honein, M. A., Riehle-Colarusso, T., Shin, M., & Correa, A. (2013). Temporal trends in survival among infants with critical congenital heart defects. Pediatrics, 131(5), e1502-1508. http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-3435 
3. Udink ten Cate, F. E. A., & Sreeram, N. (2011). Pacing therapy in infants and children with congenital and acquired heart block: Optimal pacing strategies, management and follow-up. In M. K. Das (Ed.), Modern pacemakers: Present and future (pp. 89-116). Rijeka, Croatia: Intech. Retrieved from http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/13776.pdf  
4. The St. Jude Medical™ AMPLATZER™ Duct Occluder II AS is a percutaneous transcatheter occlusion device intended for nonsurgical closure of patent ductus arteriosus. There are certain potential risks associated with catheter-based procedures as well as additional risks that may be associated with the device. A patient’s doctor is the best source of information about the risks of having an implanted device. Individuals should talk with their doctors to better understand the potential benefits and risks for them.
5. St. Jude Medical™ prosthetic heart valves are indicated for use as replacement valves in patients with a diseased, damaged, or malfunctioning native or prosthetic valve. There are risks with any heart valve replacement. Individual risks are best evaluated by a heart surgeon and cardiologist, and generally depend on age, general health, specific medical conditions and heart function. Individuals should talk with their doctors to better understand the potential benefits and risks for them. This device is not approved for commercial use in any geography. This device is not approved by the FDA for commercial use in the United States. 
6. The AMPLATZER™ Septal Occluder is a percutaneous, transcatheter, atrial septal defect closure device intended for the occlusion of atrial septal defects (ASDs) of patients who have undergone a fenestrated Fontan procedure and who now require closure of the fenestration. There are certain potential risks associated with catheter-based procedures as well as additional risks that may be associated with the device. A patient’s doctor is the best source of information about the risks of having an implanted device. Individuals should talk with their doctors to better understand the potential benefits and risks for them.
7. The PediMag™ Blood Pump is indicated for use with the CentriMag™ Console and Motor to pump blood through the extracorporeal bypass circuit for extracorporeal circulatory support for periods appropriate to cardiopulmonary bypass (up to six hours) for surgical procedures such as mitral valve reoperation. It is also indicated for use in extracorporeal support systems (for periods up to six hours) not requiring complete cardiopulmonary bypass (e.g., valvuloplasty, circulatory support during mitral valve reoperation, surgery of the vena cava or aorta, liver transplants, etc.). There are certain risks associated with any implant surgery. A patient’s doctor is the best source of information about the risks of having an implanted device. Individuals should talk with their doctors to better understand the potential benefits and risks for them.